Coupe Build From Australia

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747PETE
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Post by 747PETE » Tue Dec 12, 2017 5:33 pm

Stunning work as always Victor and credit to your refinisher for that standard of work.Regards the alloy for the gutters,a pity I have been away from this thread for awhile,I am retired now from the aircraft industry.The sort of alloy that would work well here too is 2024 grade T0 alloy.The 0 grade is very soft and easy to form and can be bought in AllyClad status,basically a corrosion proof coating.Boeing use it a great deal in conventinal airframe structures..viz 747/777 we used 2024 T3 and T6 a great deal.My SE5A dashboard is made from it. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2024_alum ... loy#2024-O Very impressive how you have formed that,was it on a press brake I wonder? no mean feet!



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Post by Scott » Tue Dec 12, 2017 6:13 pm

My SE5A dashboard is made from it.

Pete do you have pictures of your dash? i'd be really interested to see it



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Post by Pepe » Thu Jan 25, 2018 10:36 pm

Looking forward to see updates of the body later (.. in its ivory colour, I bet it's ivory... or light primer grey :D )


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Post by mermar74 » Sat Feb 10, 2018 10:50 am

Continued from previous instalment;


End of Body Repairs


Work at the body shop has come a long way since last instalment; all repairs have now been carried out and as well the body painted and made ready.

My acquaintance body restoration man has singularly carried out all of this work, and the results of his efforts are truly magnificent.
This master craftsman has successfully transformed this 50 year old crude and poorly made GRP body into one of the most flawless bodies I have ever seen; an incredible feat I barely thought possible! He gets my highest praise for his fabulous work and I am most grateful for his outstanding efforts.

The paint colour I chose is Mercedes Ivory; a period colour I think suits perfectly the look I am after. The pictures shown here are not a true representation of the colour; it is quite different in the flesh.
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Reaching this exciting stage of build has invigorated added enthusiasm as there is no doubt now the end is finally closer than the beginning after the many years of work.

With the body safely back in my workshop work started again in earnest. Great care needs to be exercise now not to mare the finish during assembly.

I decided to add heat shielding to the engine compartment and floor underside to protect these areas from radiant heat. Properly done, this will reduce interior temperatures and make the driving experience more pleasant especially in our hot climate.
As well, I wish to install modern acoustic dampening sheeting inside the cabin in place of the jute underfelt haphazardly slapped on in abundance by the factory.

Researching the market led me to purchase shielding material from Car Builders Australia; they have a good range of quality products that are ideal for what I need.

As room is tight around the engine compartment, I chose their peel and stick heat shielding as this does not require an air gap at the rear of shielding. This adhesive sheet material cuts with a scissors, shapes easily and adheres directly to most automotive surfaces. It is also ideal for shielding the floor underside from exhaust heat.

I started firstly on the bulkhead.
Tailoring the shielding to suit this area is not straight forward due to the complex shapes involved. This required making cardboard patterns to help shape the shielding. The tailored shielding was next carefully aligned and adhered to the GRP. A suitable roller was used to contour the shielding into shape.
Aluminium foil tape was lastly used to seal the joins.
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I next moved onto shielding to the floor underside; sections of the same shielding material were cut to size, aligned and adhered to the floor above the exhaust path.
I decided to use sheet aluminium for shielding where the bulkhead meets the floor as adhesive shielding is not practical in these areas. I folded and shaped a pair of suitable alloy shields and screwed these to the floor above the exhaust path leaving a 10mm air gap between the shields and GRP.

With this work done, the body is now ready to be reunited with the chassis for the final time.
I have successfully lifted the body on and off the chassis countless times on my own using my purpose built lifting frame, wheeled gantry and block and tackle, but for peace of mind extra help will be required this time to lessen the risk of marring the finish.

I made a start by supporting the chassis off the ground a few inches. I next covered the upper areas of the body with blankets and foam, and carefully attached the lifting frame to the body.
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With three extra helpers the body was successfully lifted off the cart, placed into position and lowered onto the chassis without damage much to my relief.
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The next couple of days were spent completing the body to chassis fastening.

To be continued:
Victor Pace



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Post by efi_sprintgte » Sat Feb 10, 2018 11:07 am

Amazing and inspiring work!


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Post by ozscim » Sat Feb 10, 2018 2:43 pm

Stunning!!!



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Post by Roger Pennington » Sat Feb 10, 2018 6:23 pm

That looks fantastic, Victor! :D


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Post by Scott » Mon Feb 12, 2018 7:19 am

Almost brought a tear to my eye

What a milestone, as you say the end is in sight now.

By the way I love the colour, very rich. I can't wait to see the contrast with the glass and hardware on.



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Post by 747PETE » Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:37 am

Absolutely magnificent Victor👍😍



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Post by DARK STAR » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:29 pm

Waouw :D


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Post by philhoward » Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:32 pm

That's a wonderful choice of colour (and body man), Victor - really suits the car.


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Post by Pepe » Tue Feb 20, 2018 7:45 pm

YES! I know its Ivory :)
Great work.. as usual! Thumbs up, mate!


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Post by Nigel Clark » Tue Feb 20, 2018 8:28 pm

I struggle to get my head around such quality without any trace of compromise. It's wonderful, amazing, beautiful, not enough adjectives available. I am truly in awe.

Victor, we are extremely fortunate that you are building such an example of what Reliant could never have done, and more fortunate still that you post here in detail to keep us informed.

Thank you!

Nigel



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Post by mermar74 » Tue Mar 27, 2018 9:56 pm

Continued from previous instalment;

Final Body Assembly

With the body now securely mounted to the chassis, the long anticipated body assembly can now begin. When starting with an empty body shell this work is best carried out in a certain sequence for easier assembly.

I started by firstly installing the windshield wiper assembly.
The awkward routing of these components gives the impression Reliant built this car around the wiper assembly, so best to install these first when nothing else is in the way.

The heater assembly was next installed and plumbed.
The threaded matrix hose connectors and redesigned heater case mounting has made heater installation a lesser chore, although the bulky EFI manifold only allows access to the heater hoses from the underside of car.

I next moved to the rear of the car and fitted the fuel tank, filler neck, new filler cap and connected the fuel plumbing. It came as a relief there are no leaks after introducing fuel into the system.

Next I made a start on installing the electrical wiring harness.
This custom system incorporates a great deal more components and wiring than the original making installation quite an involved and time consuming task.
The fuse box, relay board and bus bars were firstly installed, followed by the main wiring harness. The harness leading to front of car was next routed inside the left side mudguard and all connections made.

At this stage I decided to install a radio antenna; I much prefer a concealed unit on this car rather than the roof antenna originally fitted.
I looked at all sorts of available antennas on the market, and in the end decided to mount a standard telescopic mast antenna inside the left front mudguard. There is enough room inside the guard to horizontally mount this type of antenna and extend the antenna mast for best reception.
A suitable mounting bracket was constructed and the antenna ground connected to the chassis thus utilising the chassis as the ground plane. With all hooked up and working, I was amazed to find excellent radio reception on both the AM and FM bands.

With the main wiring loom now installed I made a start installing the electronic engine management components and EFI wiring harness. This job reminded me clearly how little room is available inside this car for housing the multitude of wiring and electronics required. Once completed, I double checked every component and wire connection for correct installation.

The next stage of assembly was to install the dashboard and all other electrical auxiliaries.
The headlamps, front and rear lamps, interior lamp, switches, horns, radio, speakers and all other electrics were installed, wired up and tested. This stage became a small highlight in this build as (for the first time after all the years of work) the car started obeying to commands and coming alive.

I decided to fit LED bulbs throughout (except headlamps) and quickly learned not all LED bulbs are created equal.
I found the stop – tail and indicator bulbs I purchased not bright enough for the task; this trouble me as it poses a risk of not being readily seen by following motorists and getting rear ended.
I eventually located high intensity LED bulbs ideal for this application; these are supplied with a resister that needs to be wired into the electrical circuit.
To my delight, installing these bulbs netted quite bright lighting from the small diameter Coupe rear lamps.

For the next stage I decided to bring the brakes alive; this requires final installation of the Wilwood front callipers and bleeding the hydraulics. This all worked out successful eventually, only now the original wheels will not fit as these foul with the front callipers.

Some time ago I carried out a lot of research on replacement wheels, but had no luck finding wheels in Australia with the correct backspacing and bolt pattern to suit this application. I have no desire to use wheel spacers and want all four wheels to have the same width and offset; meeting these criteria’s greatly limited finding suitable wheels locally.

Further research led me to an Australian wheel company able to tailor their range of wheels to suit odd combinations. This firm imports quality semi finished alloy wheels that can be finish machined to suit customer specifications. Most of their wheel range are too modern looking for my taste, but fortunately they have available a 15” by 6.5” Minilite copy that can be tailored to suit my requirements.
After some deliberation I ordered 4 wheels, and upon delivery was most pleased with the finished product.
These custom wheels have been machined to my specs, are numbered, have my name included on the wheel markings and incorporate steel tapered seat inserts for wheel nut seating (a lot of alloy wheels don’t these days). As well, these wheels are supplied with locking wheel nuts and a corresponding socket.

Next, tyres;
Even though the rear axle is almost 2” shorter than the original, I found a 195 – 65 - 15 to be the widest tyre that fits inside the rear wheel wells without interfering with the arch lips. In hindsight, I could have shortened the rear axle another inch which would have allowed me to use wider tyres, although my calculations at the time were for 6 inch and not 6.5 inch rims.

I finally settled on purchasing a set of Pirelli P6 tyres and had these installed and balanced on the rims.

Fitting these on the car has resulted in a transformation that is much to my liking.
This wheel combination provides the exact look, stance and tyre height I wanted from the start of this build. As well, the 6.5” rim width fills the front wheel wells nicely without protruding outside of the body, and the 195- 65 tyre size to be the best all round size for my requirements.

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To be continued:
Victor Pace



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Post by efi_sprintgte » Tue Mar 27, 2018 10:15 pm

8) :D


JC

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