Coupe Build From Australia

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mermar74
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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by mermar74 » Wed Feb 22, 2017 9:01 pm

747PETE wrote:A very elegant solution Victor,almost a venturi effect as well.I just wonder how much movement there might be from the engine relative to the fixed duct.The chap who did all that bodyprep deserves a real pat on the back!
Hi Pete,

The air filter is able to move independent of the fixed air scoop.

Yes, the bodyman certainly deserves praise for all the hard work; mind you a lot of work is still required to finess the body prior to painting. With the amount of work and grand expense required to repair this poorly made body I can now say with some definition that this will be the first and last GRP car I will build.



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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by steve bryant » Thu Feb 23, 2017 8:16 am

very neat there victor.
it is very similar to the set up we do for our fuel injected cobra cars, our box is a little bit larger though and picks up the same as yours.
the daytona coupe has a double skin bonnet and we use two ducts to direct air for the engine and air con unit, nothing is visible here except the exit points



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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by mermar74 » Thu Apr 27, 2017 7:27 am

Continued from previous instalment;

Wiring

Next job on this build is to sort out the electrical wiring.

The original 50 year old wiring loom is showing signs of age and wear, and in need of repair. A study of the factory wiring diagram clarified additional circuit protection and relays would be most beneficial. Weighing up my options, I decided to make a complete new loom rather than repairing the original.

A new loom will provide the opportunity to re arrange the wiring paths to suit the many mods already carried out, and incorporate wiring circuits for powering additional electrical components fitted to this car. These include;

EFI fuel pump,
Fuel pump inertia switch,
Thermo fan,
Emergency 4 way flashers,
USB port,
Wiper delay,
Cruise control (a worthy addition in Australia),
Volt meter
Engine oil temp gauge.

A start was made by drawing all the additional wiring circuits on paper including relay circuits for headlights, fuel pump, ignition live, starter activation and horns. This drawing was next amalgamated into the original wiring diagram to complete the schematics.

I decided to fuse each electrical circuit independently for maximum protection; this will require a 12 way fuse box to accomplish. As well, five relays are required to suit my planned upgrade.
The earths on a GRP car require careful planning; I decided well placed bus bars would be ideal for connecting the many earth wires required.
Bus bars will also be used for reliable connection of the active feeds. Two bus bars are required; one for the permanent live circuit, the other for the ignition only live.

Items for making the loom were next procured including correct colour coded wire, an assortment of good quality crimp terminals, loom tape, fuse box and relays. As well, I purchased good quality terminal crimping tools; these were not cheap but a necessity for proper crimping results.

Finding the ideal wire routing paths is best done after positioning all the electrical components on the car. This now required finding a home for the new fuse box, relays, additional switch gear, cruise control and as well the EFI electronics (ECU and wideband controller modules, EFI fuses and relay box and much wiring). I much prefer housing electrical components inside the cabin whenever possible rather than the hot confines of an engine compartment.
Finding a good home for these components within the tight confines of a Coupe became a trial and error chore consuming much time and effort.

The new fuse box will be housed in a depression conveniently located high up on the passenger’s foot well. A bracket Sikaflexed onto the GRP will mount the fuse box to the GRP, and a removable hard cover will protect and hide it under the carpet.

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This fuse box used incorporates 12 active fused circuits as well as an earth bus bar with 12 terminals.

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The relays and flasher cans have been fixed to a mounting panel positioned directly above the fuse box.

The two main active bus bars were next made using 6mm copper plate and 8mm insulation board. These have been mounted to the upper center of bulkhead above the heater.

An earth bus bar has also been mounted to the bulkhead to cater for dash and surrounding earths.

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The battery cables were next made using fine strand welding cable and heavy duty crimp eyelets. The live cable runs from battery post to battery isolator switch, and then from isolator switch to starter post. A smaller cable delivers power from starter post to the permanent active bus bar on bulkhead. A suitable relay is used to power the ignition on bus bar taking load off the ignition switch.
The earth cable connects the battery post direct to chassis.

Making the loom proper started by wiring the dashboard while off the car.

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From here much time was consumed wiring the rest of the car.

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Other electrical associated work has been carried out during this part of the build;

I pulled apart all the gauges and carried out a thorough check over and clean. The electrical gauges were checked for calibration and adjusted to specs using the proper Smiths equipment I was fortunately able to borrow.

I decided to replace the amp gauge with a volt gauge, and the clock with an engine oil temp gauge as these are more useful to me.
The speedometer and tachometer were sent to a specialist for an overhaul. The original tach will not work with the coil pack ignition being used; the specialist converted the innards to work from an ECU signal.

The old electrical toggle switches can also benefit from some attention. I stripped these down and done a number on them; these should now last another 50 years.

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The original rotary wiper switch has been replaced with a new matching Lucas toggle switch and a new ignition switch has replaced the old.

I find the switch layout on dashboard to be a little haphazard on these models. I decided to make changes by re positioning the radio to the lower dash panel, and the ignition switch, push start button, headlights and interior light switches to where radio used to be. The rest of the switch gear has been logically positioned on the lower dash panel.
These alterations required making a custom lower dash panel and mods to the upper dash.

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To be continued:
Victor Pace



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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by Tinker man » Thu Apr 27, 2017 8:03 am

this is most inspirational.

the wiring on my project 5a will have to be faced at some time in the future (complete rewire) and this gives me plenty of ideas. i am thinking of using the glove box for the fuses and relays, to keep the engine bay less cluttered.

your work is always so neat and well thought through. lovely job.

i look forward to the next installment.

regards, Ian.


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by philhoward » Thu Apr 27, 2017 8:17 am

I've taken a similar approach in terms of a single bolt approach for a main star point for the feeds from the battery rather than a busbar - but I'm curious on the purpose of the solid state relay rather than a conventional electro-mechanical relay, Victor? I'm assuming you've already got some sort of covering/sleeve in mind for the metal hangers/clips for the cables I see in the footwell shot (or is it not visible from the picture)? Likewise I guess there's a grommet in mind for where the cables pass through fibreglass, or do you have a more elegant solution in mind?

I can only agree with your statement regarding crimp tools - good ones don't come cheap but are worth their weight in gold as there's nothing worse than a poor connection.

The Engine Start button almost looks a little out of place though - but does look inviting :)


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by mermar74 » Thu Apr 27, 2017 8:48 am

philhoward wrote:I've taken a similar approach in terms of a single bolt approach for a main star point for the feeds from the battery rather than a busbar - but I'm curious on the purpose of the solid state relay rather than a conventional electro-mechanical relay, Victor? I'm assuming you've already got some sort of covering/sleeve in mind for the metal hangers/clips for the cables I see in the footwell shot (or is it not visible from the picture)? Likewise I guess there's a grommet in mind for where the cables pass through fibreglass, or do you have a more elegant solution in mind?
Hi Phil,

The solid state relay is for the thermo fan. This will be activated and controlled by a DPO signal from the ECU; this will be covered in next instalment.

The metal hangers are only temporary; these shots were taken during early loom construction . I have since made more suitable insulated hangers. As well, the loom is now wrapped in proper loom tape and not bare.

As well, grommets have been installed in every hole used to pass wiring.

Victor



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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by ScimmyMike » Thu Apr 27, 2017 8:56 am

Looks a tad less shambolic than the wiring on my coupe currently undergoing post paint rebuild where the electricity myseriously vanishes somewhere between fuse box and dashboard area


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by philhoward » Thu Apr 27, 2017 9:03 am

mermar74 wrote:
philhoward wrote:I've taken a similar approach in terms of a single bolt approach for a main star point for the feeds from the battery rather than a busbar - but I'm curious on the purpose of the solid state relay rather than a conventional electro-mechanical relay, Victor? I'm assuming you've already got some sort of covering/sleeve in mind for the metal hangers/clips for the cables I see in the footwell shot (or is it not visible from the picture)? Likewise I guess there's a grommet in mind for where the cables pass through fibreglass, or do you have a more elegant solution in mind?
Hi Phil,

The solid state relay is for the thermo fan. This will be activated and controlled by a DPO signal from the ECU; this will be covered in next instalment.

The metal hangers are only temporary; these shots were taken during early loom construction . I have since made more suitable insulated hangers. As well, the loom is now wrapped in proper loom tape and not bare.

As well, grommets have been installed in every hole used to pass wiring.

Victor
Thanks Victor - all makes sense now I had a feeling the pictures were the initial build shots. If you're triggering the fan direct from the ECU then I can see why you went solid state rather than an electrically noisy coil-operated relay.


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by DARK STAR » Sat May 13, 2017 7:58 pm

Superb as usual, wish my wiring looked even remotely like that (or even remotely like the wiring diagram).

Admins please I am not getting update notifications on several threads including this one and Turbs' Speed Six Coupé ...


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by scimjim » Sat May 13, 2017 8:03 pm

Chris, have you checked that those threads are still in your lists? (user control panel/overview/manage subscriptions and manage bookmarks) they may have been lost during one of the updates.

Also that your email address on the forum is correct? (user control panel/profile/edit account settings).


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by DARK STAR » Sat May 13, 2017 8:08 pm

Thanks Jim, this one's back in line anyway.
No change to e-mail details, I'll check the other settings.


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by mermar74 » Wed May 17, 2017 10:09 am

Continued from previous instalment;

Engine Management and Wiring


With the body wiring now complete, the next task is to sort out the electronic engine management system. This will require purchasing and installing a suitable ECU and all associated components and wiring.

Being old school (accustomed mainly to carburetors, distributors and mechanical fuel injection), getting grips with an electronic black box capable of infinitely controlling engine fueling and ignition has not been easy. I have to admit learning just the basics of this incredible technology has been challenging for me.
Since starting this project, I have committed a great deal of time and effort learning what I can to (hopefully) carry out a successful EFI conversion on this most odd car in Australia.

Fast forward a few years;

Much research later led me to purchasing a stand alone Elite 2500 engine management system made by Haltec; an Australian owned ECU manufacturer renowned for quality components now sold worldwide.

The Elite ECU is fully programmable and offers all of what I need to control fuel and ignition and much more. Although nowhere near the cheapest on the market, this system is very versatile and its management capabilities are just about limitless. This purchase included;
An Elite 2500 ECU,
Universal 8 foot long wiring harness with fuse box – relay assembly,
2 wideband sensors,
Dual wideband controller,
Detailed wiring diagrams, instructions and software to suit.

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With these components at hand, the next task was to find suitable mounting locations inside the cabin for these parts; no easy feat due to limited room! After much experimentation I settled on mounting the ECU inside the glove box (for ease of connectivity to laptop) and the rest high up inside left foot box.

An engine management system involves much wiring; finding suitable room for routing this multitude of wires through the car turned into the next challenge

On this system the ECU incorporates 2 separate terminal plugs, each carrying a multitude of colour coded wires.
These wires connect to various sensors, 6 injectors and 6 coils.
Each coil is powered by 4 wires, each injector 2 wires, TPS 4 wires and all other engine sensors 2 wires or more each.
As well, there are 3 permanent live wires, an ignition wire, several earth wires, thermo fan wires and a tachometer wire that needs to be connected.
The fuse box assembly has 4 fuses and 4 relays for ECU, injectors, ignition and fuel pump.

The wideband controller box is a separate unit and connects to the ECU with a separate wiring loom. From this controller 4 wires need to be routed to each wideband sensor located on exhaust headers.

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It is likely engine bay heat will be high on this car due to tight confines inside the overcrowded engine compartment. Over time, excess heat will degrade wiring prompting me to enclose all susceptible wires inside fibreglass high temp sleeving for protection.

Another hurdle faced in such a conversion is the multitude of different sensor connector plugs used.

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These connectors are usually specific to each sensor, and each has different terminals requiring different crimping tools.
The outcome of this is much money can be spent purchasing several different tools.

After much work the installation and wiring was finally completed and I am pleased with the results.

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This has been a reasonably involved job not made easier by limited room and the sheer number of wires involved. I was pleased to find the Haltec wiring schematics clear and easy to follow and their help only a phone call (or email) away when required.

The next task with this EFI is to configure the ECU for the engine to run. There are no available maps for this odd engine so several parameters need to be configured; no easy task for a first timer. This will no doubt involve a great deal more learning and research for me to accomplish.

From this experience, I can now give a few tips to those contemplating such a conversion;

Start firstly by finding the professional tuner who will eventually carry out the ECU tuning. The tuner plays an important role in such an installation, as he can advise on the most suitable system (there are several), and answer questions prior to money being spent on what is a most expensive purchase.
The selected tuner needs to be familiar and knowledgeable with the chosen system, as otherwise your money will pay for his time learning an unfamiliar system.
Once decided on which system to use, a clearer picture will surface as to the correct matching components required to complete the conversion.

It is also important to purchase an engine management system from a manufacturer (or agent) that provides helpful and easily reached technical support; this inside help is priceless during evolving progress as I was to find out on several occasions.
It is also helpful if the manufacturer (or agent) holds technical seminars for those who wish to learn more in depth.

To be continued:
Victor Pace



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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by DARK STAR » Wed May 17, 2017 12:07 pm

You are a brave man Victor!
A scratch-built injection system is probably more complicated than any other aspect of the construction.
As usual you'll find the perfect solution ;)


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by philhoward » Wed May 17, 2017 1:09 pm

Haltech seem to have a very good name - good choice.

To try and get a base map, try and find one for something with a similar cylinder (head) design, valve configuration, cam figures and bore/stroke ratio. The number of cylinders and capacity doesn't actually change things that much as that is a scaling factor relating to injector size and the number of wires going out. I suspect there is probably a 2 valve per cylinder V8 with a similar configuration?


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Re: Coupe Build From Australia

Post by steve bryant » Wed May 17, 2017 1:30 pm

or the sapphire that EFI unit came from



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