Engine, preserving for long term storage?

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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by simmit » Tue Nov 06, 2018 10:28 pm

Recently bought a decent used engine (2.9efi) "just in case" but hoping I'll never need it.
What is best way to preserve internals for long term storage in the back of the garage?
For example, is it worth filling the block with 100% antifreeze (to hold back waterways corrosion)?
After using preserving oils/greases (suggestions for which please) ought the engine be turned over by hand once a month or so?
I've never preserved an engine for storage so would appreciate all comments.



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by toolmanchris » Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:31 am

Personally I would make use of a large can of WD40 - I think this is actually what it was designed for originally but could be wrong.
Obviously seal up all engine orifices as well. Ive been told that the aluminium faced duct tape is good for this
I would leave plugs in but just finger tight and probably turning it over from time to time wouldnt be a bad thing :D


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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by philynnbob » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:05 am

My spare straight 6 I have made a trolley for. I have flywheel and starter fitted which enables me to remove plugs and spin engine over weekly. This ensures oil circulation around engine and repositioning of the components..
I have kept the waterways dry ( no water pump fitted)
Last edited by philynnbob on Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:56 am, edited 2 times in total.



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by derekoss » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:38 am

Why would you turn over a completely dry engine with no chance of replacing any oil squeezed out from bearings to be replenished before you do it again !!
All you need is a dry an atmosphere in there as possible. By all means a good slug of straight oil down the bores and anywhere you can. Some small bags of silica gel in where you can and your favoured tape. Aluminium is good as it's vapour proof. Stick it in a poly bag (yes I know it's an engine) with a pound of silica gel, attach vacuum cleaner to reduce the amount of air in there, seal and don't touch it. An elastic band around a crumpled neck won't hack it !! Proper seal with tape. Your trying to stop the (now dry) air from inside escaping or being replaced with fresh wet stuff.
Every year take out the silica gel in the bag stick it in the electric oven for a bit to dry it off and shove it back in.
All the above is on the assumption it's inside a garage or shed.
WD40 as I understand it stands for water displacement for 40 days !! Useless stuff.
Dehydrator plugs are used in aero engines when laid up. Above is how 1400 hp 9 cylinder radials costing a 100k to overhaul get done.

Derek



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by Jester007 » Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:41 am

My old man always recommended putting a few drops of paraffin in the bores prior to laying an engine up long term - winding it over by hand ensures the walls get a good enough coating... in the absence of paraffin I'm sure a good thick grade oil (20W-50 would do). Then just wind it over by hand every month or so to keep things free. :)

Waterways - I think they'd be fine fully dried out (I've previously used a hair drier and a bit of hoover pipe in the thermostat housing, and left it running for an hour or so to dry out the waterways) then plug the ways in and out, its the water pump you want to stop seizing up - if you could remove it and oil the impeller bearing that would be best.

Depending how long its laid up, I'd also take the rocker covers off prior to restart and oil the cam etc.



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by philynnbob » Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:03 am

derekoss wrote:
Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:38 am
Why would you turn over a completely dry engine with no chance of replacing any oil squeezed out from bearings to be replenished before you do it again !!


Derek
Do you think oil pump does not work on turning over then?



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by gordonmc » Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:49 am

I am in the process of winterising my boat engine and will be using ACF 50 on exposed surfaces.
It comes as a spray for larger areas but for especially vulnerable components it is also available as a grease.
Advice to dry out waterways seems sound. Unfortunately no help to me because the engine is staying in the boat - a hostile environment for mechanicals so I will be filling with anti-freeze.



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by derekoss » Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:19 am

Do you think oil pump does not work on turning over then?
At starter motor speeds it will. Not by hand. Main and big end bearings work by having a dynamic flow wedge of oil which you can't achieve without speed. Personally I never turn a dry engine one degree without pre oiling for several minutes using an electric pump.
I assume we're talking brand new never run oil in the sump. Anything else could be corrosive.
As described above never gave me a problem. Moisture in the air is the enemy.

Derek



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by Villyman » Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:33 am

Good day, all!

I recently heard that thick 20W50 oil isn't getting enough to the piston rings and it's better to pour some 2-stroke oil on top of the cylinders. Anyone heard of that before?

Cheers, Tim.



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by derekoss » Thu Nov 08, 2018 11:34 am

HD32 hydraulic oil or SAE30 is what you want.

Derek



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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by Kccv23highliftcam » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:07 pm

Hi guys, I use Sea foam deep creep for just this on my laid up cvh engine. Plugs out crank over and fog the cylinders I also go in via the intake manifold for the valves.

Oil I use is a 10w40 semi with quite a good list of additives Comma Eurolite plus Torco ZEP and crank it once a month or so, get 3.8 bar on starter and good flow up top. Note NO CAT! there is a version for cat equipped cars.

I also use neat sea foam petrol additive to stabilise fuel in lines

I have just completed heater removal and by pass deletion and have filled coolant system with the correct [for age] blue Comma coolant to 50/50 concentration. The car isn't ready to roll, the higher concentration is for storage up here in the northern wastes.

Hope this helps and that it's OK to post links? I have no affiliation apart from being a very satisfied customer.

Andy Brown.
Torco-ZEP-Zinc-Engine-Oil-Additive.jpg
Torco-ZEP-Zinc-Engine-Oil-Additive.jpg (65.9 KiB) Viewed 253 times
https://seafoamsales.com/deep-creep/ "For long-term engine protection and storage, exceptional when sprayed directly into engine cylinders "

https://seafoamsales.com/sea-foam-motor-treatment/ "Sea Foam helps to stabilize stored fuel for up to two years by resisting evaporation, preserving ignition vapors, and preventing the formation of gum and varnish.
Sea Foam lubricates upper cylinders and helps to protect the entire fuel system from dry out, wear and corrosion."


1597 [+ .005] cvh with kent Kccv23 cam living in a heavily worked and skimmed head fed by twin 40's fueled by home made leaded 5* plus...XR2 gearbox rebuilt by abbey with 4.29 final drive.....sitting in the back of Jeremy Phillips 2nd development Mojo....

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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by scimjim » Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:18 pm

Welcome Andy - sounds like an interesting car?


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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by Kccv23highliftcam » Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:07 pm

Actually I came on here after a google search for -wait for it- aldon amethyst directed here. Unfortunately thread is no longer in Archives or I'm not permitted access.

Which is a shame as Aldon seem ..reluctant...[pun fully intentional] to advise on cvh installation.

Now before we start, I'm looking to get it back on the road, twin 40's and all and yes if there is a amethyst "weak" link it could be the slack internally and in the dizzy. But there isn't really any on this one..

..my main point of concern is whether the lucas cvh reluctor will have enough oomph to trigger the amythist. From the spec sheet they say the amethyst wants 3mA as the trigger input. Hmmm... I need more info before taking the plunge


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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by scimjim » Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:17 pm

Yes, you need to be a club member to access the archives.

All of the threads I can see concern the GTE but I can confirm from one, that it works with the Ford Duraspark as fitted to the Cologne. ScimmyMike asked Aldon the question.


Jim King

Current: SE5 (8Ball), TI SS1 (snotty), 1600 SS1 (G97), 1600 SS1 (C686CCR), 2.5TD SE5a (diesel 5a), 6 x random other SS1s.
Previous: SE5, 3 x SE5a, 2 x SE6a, 3 x SE6b, GTC, 2.9i GTC, 3 x 1600 SS1, 1300 SS1, Mk1 Ti Sabre, Mk1.5 CVH Sabre
Chief mechanic for: 1400 K series SS1 (Megan3), 1400 CVH EFi SS1 (Grawpy), Sabre/MX5 auto (The Flying Broomstick),
1300 SS1 (Number One) & Sarah's coupe.
CURE THE FAULT - NOT THE SYMPTOMS

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Engine, preserving for long term storage?

Post by Kccv23highliftcam » Sun Nov 11, 2018 1:21 pm

derekoss wrote:
Wed Nov 07, 2018 9:38 am
Why would you turn over a completely dry engine with no chance of replacing any oil squeezed out from bearings to be replenished before you do it again !!
All you need is a dry an atmosphere in there as possible. By all means a good slug of straight oil down the bores and anywhere you can. Some small bags of silica gel in where you can and your favoured tape. Aluminium is good as it's vapour proof. Stick it in a poly bag (yes I know it's an engine) with a pound of silica gel, attach vacuum cleaner to reduce the amount of air in there, seal and don't touch it. An elastic band around a crumpled neck won't hack it !! Proper seal with tape. Your trying to stop the (now dry) air from inside escaping or being replaced with fresh wet stuff.
Every year take out the silica gel in the bag stick it in the electric oven for a bit to dry it off and shove it back in.
All the above is on the assumption it's inside a garage or shed.
WD40 as I understand it stands for water displacement for 40 days !! Useless stuff.
Dehydrator plugs are used in aero engines when laid up. Above is how 1400 hp 9 cylinder radials costing a 100k to overhaul get done.

Derek
Actually the 40 bit of WD40 comes from the Atlas missile program. They had issues with water condensing and turning to ICE over the propellant tanks and WD40 was the 40th attempt to overcome this water problem!


1597 [+ .005] cvh with kent Kccv23 cam living in a heavily worked and skimmed head fed by twin 40's fueled by home made leaded 5* plus...XR2 gearbox rebuilt by abbey with 4.29 final drive.....sitting in the back of Jeremy Phillips 2nd development Mojo....

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